Pubblicato il 12 Apr 2021
Pubblicato il 12 Apr 2021
What can I do after a biomedical science degree?

What can I do after a biomedical science degree?


Are you on the way towards the end of your biomedical science degree, but you don’t have a clue about the next step you need to take in your career? Medical (or Biomedical) Science is an extremely dynamic profession and there are countless jobs you could find; all you need to do is to decide which part of your degree you enjoyed the most and start looking for something related to that. Was it the lab work? Was it that neuroscience module you took in the 2nd year? Or was it that one Microbiology practical that intrigued you? Whatever was your favorite thing of your degree, have a look on these four ideas of future careers that may inspire you to find your dream job.

Biomedical science degree: MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY

If you enjoyed your Microbiology and/or Bacteriology and Virology modules and labs during your degree you may want to consider pursuing a career in this field. You will help in the prevention, diagnosis and control of infections and diseases, play a key role in food safety or explore the role that microbes play in the environment, getting involved in important issues such as the climate change. Tasks you will need to do vary from specialty to specialty but, in a nutshell, you will need to monitor and identify microorganisms, to investigate a varied range of samples and search for the presence of microbes using specialist computer software and laboratory based identification methods. You may also help in developing new medicines, vaccines, diagnostic tests or pharmaceutical products. If you wish to enter a career as a microbiologist in the NHS, you will need to apply for NHS Scientist Training Programme. For more information about the programme, visit this link.

Biomedical science degree: HEALTHCARE SCIENTIST

Healthcare scientists (also known as clinical scientists) are part of the hospital staff and play a vital role in the patients’ diagnosis and treatment. There are several specialties you could choose from, such as: - haematology (the study of blood, blood-forming tissues, blood related disorders) - immunology ( the study of immune diseases and disorders) - clinical chemistry ( diagnose patients based on investigation of samples taken from patients' blood, urine or other bodily fluids) - genetics (the examination of patients' DNA samples to identify genetic abnormalities) - histology (diagnose patients based on microscopic studies of tissue samples) In what concerns the professional development, trainee healthcare scientists on the NHS Scientist Training Programme (STP) undertake three years of training accredited by the National School for Healthcare Science. The first year of training is spent on rotation in a range of settings before specialising in years two and three. Entry in the STP Programme is very competitive and you will need a first or a 2:1 degree. As a healthcare scientist you will also be expected to have some strong group work skills as you will be liaising with other medical professionals to discuss patient’s diagnosis and treatment plan.

Biomedical science degree: HIGHER EDUCATION LECTURER

Have you ever found yourself in the middle of a lecture thinking about how would you teach a certain topic if you were the professor at that time? If you feel that teaching may be your thing, you could become a Higher Education Lecturer and dedicate your life to teaching undergraduates or postgraduates a biomedical science related subject that you personally love. It sounds appealing, right? If you want to become a HE Lecturer you will need to have a first or 2:1 degree in a subject relevant to what you want to lecture in and also you will also be expected to have or currently work towards a relevant PhD. You will teach students using methods that include lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical labs or e-learning; you will also be involved in a range of administrative tasks such as assessing students coursework, setting and marking examinations or developing innovative methods of teaching. Furthermore, you will need to undertake personal research projects in order to actively contribute to the research profile of the institution you’re working for.

Biomedical science degree: MEDICAL SCHOOL – GRADUATE ENTRY

If you’re finishing a biomedical science degree, but you’ve always wanted to become a doctor, it’s never too late to pursue your dream. In order to do so, you could apply for a graduate-entry medicine course. The application must be sent via UCAS (in most of the cases) to no more than four schools and it must include a reference and a personal statement. The tests you will need to take are UKCAT or GAMSAT, depending on the university you are applying for. Most of the universities will require you to have a 2:1 or above degree, so be careful and study for your exams during your current undergraduate course. Work experience in a health setting is also a very important part of your application, so make sure you will have dedicated a considerable amount of time to shadowing physicians, volunteering in hospitals/nursing homes, learning and providing First Aid at different events (St John Ambulance or Red Cross charities may come in handy for this), etc. The universities offering four-year medical courses are: Barts, Birmingham, Bristol, Cambridge, Imperial, Keele, KCL, Leicester, Liverpool, Newcastle, Nottingham, Southampton, St George’s, Swansea and Warwick. Check each of them out for any special requirements regarding the entrance tests, amount of work experience and previous degrees performance they may expect.

 

Read also:Top 4 Health Related Societies in the Leeds University Union

Are you on the way towards the end of your biomedical science degree, but you don’t have a clue about the next step you need to take in your career? Medical (or Biomedical) Science is an extremely dynamic profession and there are countless jobs you could find; all you need to do is to decide which part of your degree you enjoyed the most and start looking for something related to that. Was it the lab work? Was it that neuroscience module you took in the 2nd year? Or was it that one Microbiology practical that intrigued you? Whatever was your favorite thing of your degree, have a look on these four ideas of future careers that may inspire you to find your dream job.

Biomedical science degree: MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY

If you enjoyed your Microbiology and/or Bacteriology and Virology modules and labs during your degree you may want to consider pursuing a career in this field. You will help in the prevention, diagnosis and control of infections and diseases, play a key role in food safety or explore the role that microbes play in the environment, getting involved in important issues such as the climate change. Tasks you will need to do vary from specialty to specialty but, in a nutshell, you will need to monitor and identify microorganisms, to investigate a varied range of samples and search for the presence of microbes using specialist computer software and laboratory based identification methods. You may also help in developing new medicines, vaccines, diagnostic tests or pharmaceutical products. If you wish to enter a career as a microbiologist in the NHS, you will need to apply for NHS Scientist Training Programme. For more information about the programme, visit this link.

Biomedical science degree: HEALTHCARE SCIENTIST

Healthcare scientists (also known as clinical scientists) are part of the hospital staff and play a vital role in the patients’ diagnosis and treatment. There are several specialties you could choose from, such as: - haematology (the study of blood, blood-forming tissues, blood related disorders) - immunology ( the study of immune diseases and disorders) - clinical chemistry ( diagnose patients based on investigation of samples taken from patients' blood, urine or other bodily fluids) - genetics (the examination of patients' DNA samples to identify genetic abnormalities) - histology (diagnose patients based on microscopic studies of tissue samples) In what concerns the professional development, trainee healthcare scientists on the NHS Scientist Training Programme (STP) undertake three years of training accredited by the National School for Healthcare Science. The first year of training is spent on rotation in a range of settings before specialising in years two and three. Entry in the STP Programme is very competitive and you will need a first or a 2:1 degree. As a healthcare scientist you will also be expected to have some strong group work skills as you will be liaising with other medical professionals to discuss patient’s diagnosis and treatment plan.

Biomedical science degree: HIGHER EDUCATION LECTURER

Have you ever found yourself in the middle of a lecture thinking about how would you teach a certain topic if you were the professor at that time? If you feel that teaching may be your thing, you could become a Higher Education Lecturer and dedicate your life to teaching undergraduates or postgraduates a biomedical science related subject that you personally love. It sounds appealing, right? If you want to become a HE Lecturer you will need to have a first or 2:1 degree in a subject relevant to what you want to lecture in and also you will also be expected to have or currently work towards a relevant PhD. You will teach students using methods that include lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical labs or e-learning; you will also be involved in a range of administrative tasks such as assessing students coursework, setting and marking examinations or developing innovative methods of teaching. Furthermore, you will need to undertake personal research projects in order to actively contribute to the research profile of the institution you’re working for.

Biomedical science degree: MEDICAL SCHOOL – GRADUATE ENTRY

If you’re finishing a biomedical science degree, but you’ve always wanted to become a doctor, it’s never too late to pursue your dream. In order to do so, you could apply for a graduate-entry medicine course. The application must be sent via UCAS (in most of the cases) to no more than four schools and it must include a reference and a personal statement. The tests you will need to take are UKCAT or GAMSAT, depending on the university you are applying for. Most of the universities will require you to have a 2:1 or above degree, so be careful and study for your exams during your current undergraduate course. Work experience in a health setting is also a very important part of your application, so make sure you will have dedicated a considerable amount of time to shadowing physicians, volunteering in hospitals/nursing homes, learning and providing First Aid at different events (St John Ambulance or Red Cross charities may come in handy for this), etc. The universities offering four-year medical courses are: Barts, Birmingham, Bristol, Cambridge, Imperial, Keele, KCL, Leicester, Liverpool, Newcastle, Nottingham, Southampton, St George’s, Swansea and Warwick. Check each of them out for any special requirements regarding the entrance tests, amount of work experience and previous degrees performance they may expect.

 

Read also:Top 4 Health Related Societies in the Leeds University Union